The Fremocentrist.com Art Inventory

August 19, 2016

Limited-Edition ‘Storm Tossed Rye Whiskey’ Arrives From The Seas To Fremont

Kirby Lindsay Laney

Fremont Mischief has partnered with ‘The Deadliest Catch’ Captain Sig Hansen, Captain Casey McManus and Captain Josh Harris to create ‘Storm Tossed Rye Whiskey’, available starting August 20th.  The ‘Whiskey Slam’, an epic competition, will create two flavors of rye, aged on the rough, storm-tossed West Bering Sea or for a season longer on the smooth, frigid Arctic seas.  Best of all, sales of both blends will benefit charitable foundations that support the commercial fishing workers.

“My Storm Tossed Rye is better than yours!,” proclaimed Captain Hansen, who took his barrels of rye in the F/V Northwestern and out on the Bering Sea, for a smoky, rich flavor with a hint of briny sea; creating smooth sipping for whiskey lovers and strong enough for fishermen.

“Rough water makes for rough whiskey,” said Captain McManus, “our Storm Tossed Rye is smooth, with woodsy smoke.  People are going to love our whiskey.  We bet it will sell out long before yours.”  Captains McManus and Harris took their barrels on F/V Cornelia Marie on the smoother seas of the Arctic.

On August 20th, the ship-aged Storm Tossed Rye will be bottled and ready for purchased.  Bottles will be labeled with the image of the captain and ship that aged the whiskey inside – and the first captain to sell out their blend wins the challenge.

Yet, everyone wins as sales of the limited-release Storm Tossed Rye Whiskey could donate more than $40,000 to the Seattle’s Fisherman’s Memorial and the Sea Scouts SES Propeller and the SES Yankee Clipper.  “Commercial fishing is among the most dangerous work in the world,” observed Mike Sherlock of Fremont Mischief, “No one who fishes commercially is untouched.  We all have friends, loved ones and family who have been lost at sea.”

This limited-release, and the joint fundraising, came through the partnership with Fremont Mischief and Captains Hansen, McManus and Harris, plus F/V Conelia Marie majority owners Captain Roger Thomas and Captain Kari Toivola.  The vision for the benefit came from Sherlock and Doug Dixon, manager at Pacific Fishermen Shipyard.  He brought on the beneficiaries, the Sea Scouts.  “Sea Scouts train the next generation of people who, like all of us, love living and working on the water.  It teaches young people to maintain, repair and operate larger vessels safely.”

Beginning August 26th, both blends of Storm Tossed Rye Whiskey will be available at the Fremont Mischief Distillery & Tasting Room, and through Fremont Mischief on-line orders (where legal.)  Some local stores, bars and restaurants will also be serving the very limited-edition Rye – so be sure to ask for it when out enjoying an adult beverage.

Find out more about this special edition, and the epic challenge, on the Fremont Mischief website – and videos on YouTube of the Captains talking about their adventures on the high seas!

 

August 18, 2016

Early Design Given On 900 N 34th St Redevelopment

Kirby Lindsay Laney
A new commercial building has been proposed for the north east corner of Troll Ave & N 34th St.  Photos provided by Weber Thompson

A new commercial building has been proposed for the north east corner of Troll Ave & N 34th St. Photos provided by Weber Thompson

On Monday, August 8th, neighbors filled a meeting room at the Good Shepherd Center to hear about, and comment on, a proposed 7-story office building for 900 N 34th St, to be built under the Living Building Pilot Program.  This would be the third building built under this program (and the second in Fremont,) which requires the structure to meet very high, very strict standards of energy conservation and sustainability.

The building proposal to the Design/Review Board was given by CoU LLC, the ownership partners currently building across Troll Ave from 900, at 744 N 34th St.  The architects, Weber Thompson, also designed 744 as well.  The presentation as given can be seen as a .pdf from Seattle.gov.

The presenters did explain that their original presentation changed based on input from residential neighbors, sidewalk users, and commercial tenants in the area.  They’ve also included, although city standards don’t require it, 21 vehicle stalls, 77 bike storage units and public parking for 12 bikes.  They’ve also considered in their plans the major landmarks in the vicinity as well as the ‘lower case l landmarks’, multi-modal transportation around the area, the steep grade of the site and the wide building set-back required.

The preferred massing scheme for the proposed building at 900 N 34th St, under consideration by the Design/Review Board.  Design by Weber Thompson Architects

The preferred massing scheme for the proposed building at 900 N 34th St, under consideration by the Design/Review Board. Design by Weber Thompson Architects

The proposed building included view corridors for neighboring buildings, creative use of storm water off the roofs, decks and Aurora Bridge surface, and activated pedestrian areas.  They’ve also asked for departures from zoning standards with increased structure height, in order to provide more daylight inside the structure (using less electric light,) and permission to remove a mandatory loading area (required on commercial structures) on the back alley of the building.

Members of the Design/Review Board asked for clarification about the ‘ambitious’ water plan, the argument against the loading dock, the practicality of some of the office spaces, and that no fixed tenants are signed on for the space.

Public comments included many in full support of the project – specifically for removal of the loading dock.  The builders were also commended for their outreach efforts, for considering the experience of pedestrians, and for their dedication to responsible storm water management.

Several commenters spoke against the project – or asked for more information.  As one commenter observed, so much of what was said in the presentation and by the Board, was difficult for simple laymen to understand.  Still, neighbors to the north spoke passionately about the negative impacts this building could have on their views and their equity.  The increased height request drew criticism, along with the scale of entire project.

The Design/Review Board Chair ended the comment period by explaining that they appreciated all the comments.  They would not be making decisions on the zoning departures at this meeting.  Also, as this was an Early Design Guidance meeting, there will be another public meeting in the future as the design is enhanced and refined.

Find more details about this project on the Seattle.gov website.

 

August 17, 2016

Temporary Bike Detour Under Aurora Bridge Starts August 22nd

Kirby Lindsay Laney
Burke-Gilman Trail will have a short detour under the Aurora Bridge, in place until late October 2016.  Photo provided by WSDOT

Burke-Gilman Trail will have a short detour under the Aurora Bridge, in place until late October 2016. Photo provided by WSDOT

On Monday, August 22nd, at 9a, the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) will put in place a short reroute of the Burke-Gilman Trail under the Fremont portion of the Aurora Bridge.  This detour is due to last through mid-fall.

Currently, construction crews are painting and doing restoration work on the historic George Washington Memorial Bridge, a.k.a. the Aurora Bridge.  The project requires a lot of heavy equipment and safety gear in order to get quality work done quickly.  WSDOT has consulted with the crews and members of the cycling community in order to find a detour that will both protect the public and allow work to get done.

“Finding a detour through this area that works for trail users and minimizes the effects on cyclists has been very challenging,” said WSDOT Project Engineer Dave Lindberg. “This detour keeps trail users close to the existing trail and minimizes their exposure to more heavily traveled streets.”

The detour will give contractor crews a 200-foot section of the trail on which to locate equipment and gear, while runners, walkers and cyclists will shift from the Trail onto North Northlake Way and a U-Park System parking lot.  Trail users are encouraged to stay on the marked detour, and use caution while traveling across the road and parking lot – which will both remain open to vehicle traffic as well.  The area is also adjacent to the Lake Washington Rowing Club where rowers will be moving their long boats.  Please be careful and considerate at all times when passing through this area, whether by vehicle, bicycle or on foot.

The detour is scheduled to be in place through October 31st.  This painting project is one piece in the $18.7 million two-part restoration project aimed at preserving and protecting our landmark and vital transportation connector.  Find more, specific details on this project, and the detour, on the WSDOT project website.

 

August 16, 2016

Put Your Phrase Down For Posterity With A Patches Paver

Kirby Lindsay Laney

This fall, a few more of the pavers beneath the J.P. Patches & Gertrude statue, the ‘Late For The Interurban’ by Kevin Edwin Pettelle, will be engraved – and if you want to share your message, name or honor a friend forever in Fremont – the deadline to contact History House of Greater Seattle about your own personalized paver is Friday, August 26th at 5p.

Put your words into the firmament of Fremont by buying a Patches Paver through History House.  Photo by K. Lindsay Laney, Aug '09

Put your words into the firmament of Fremont by buying a Patches Paver through History House. Photo by K. Lindsay Laney, Aug ’09

It’s not too late to get your inscription immortalized forever in one of the engraved pavers.  Get one or two lines of text for only $100, or get three lines for $125.

New names and quotes to be engraved at the base of the 'Late For The Interurban' sculpture by Kevin Pettelle in Fall 2016.

New names and quotes to be engraved at the base of the ‘Late For The Interurban’ sculpture by Kevin Pettelle in Fall 2016.

Proceeds from engraving (and donations given in the can at the statue,) over and above costs for the statues’ maintenance, go to the Children’s Hospital Foundation in honor of J.P. Patches & Gertrude.  The statue, and the pavers, are maintained by History House of Greater Seattle.  Go to the History House website for the printable .pdf paver reservation form, or call 206/675-8875 for more details about how you can get your words into the permanent narrative of Fremont!

 

August 15, 2016

Temporary Traffic Disruption On Leary Way Curve In Fremont

Kirby Lindsay Laney
Traffic tie-ups could occur, for a few days in mid-August, on Leary Way NW.  Photo provided by SPU

Traffic tie-ups could occur, for a few days in mid-August, on Leary Way NW. Photo provided by SPU

Starting August 22nd, Seattle Public Utilities crews may be doing soil investigation work in the middle of Leary Way NW, near 2nd Ave NW, where the roadway curves off of N 36th St.  The work could take up to five days to complete, and could disrupt traffic, while restricting parking in the area.

The soil investigation is part of the Ship Canal Water Quality Project, and the proposed building of an elongated sewer overflow tank between Ballard and Fremont, along the Leary corridor.  At this location, crews will drill 6-inch diameter holes to depths of up to 150-feet, refill the holes and restore the surface, before they finish.

For more information visit the Ship Canal Water Quality Project website or contact Dylan Menes, Project Manager, at 206/733-9934 or dylan.menes@seattle.gov  Also consider signing up for project updates through the Ship Canal Project website.

 

Older Posts »

©2016 Kirby Laney.  This column is protected by intellectual property laws, including U.S. copyright laws.  Reproduction, adaptation or distribution without permission is prohibited.

www.fremocentrist.com

Fremocentrist Logo Sm Home Contact Fremocentrist | Website:Cougar Mountain Productions | ©2016 The Fremocentrist